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KILT MAINTENANCE GUIDE

KILT MAINTENANCE GUIDE

A kilt is a garment that will last you a lifetime and so it is very important that you buy a heavy weight cloth and have it made by a reputable kiltmaker. A kilt is a man’s old faithful friend and most men will usually own one kilt in their lifetime. Therefore taking proper care of your kilt will not only ensure it stays looking its best for years to come but will also allow the kilt to be passed down the generations as a family heirloom. Read on for advice on maintaining, cleaning and storing your kilt to keep your Highland wear in tip top condition.

Stain Proofing

To ensure your kilt is well taken care of it is recommended that your kilt be Teflon coated. This will make your kilt stain (and even beer!) proof. All Houston’s own designs are Teflon coated but this is available for 350 other tartans which are not an original Houston’s design and on special weave tartans.

stain proof

At Houston’s we were the first to Teflon coat/stain proof all our tartans, which makes our kilts and jackets fully protected from rain and stains. The fabric is even beer proof! The wool has the same handle and is fully breathable, making them safe to wear to rugby and football matches.

We calculate that over the life span of your kilt you will save approximately £180 to £260, not having to get your kilt dry cleaned as often. This also helps the environment. The Teflon coating lasts a minimum of 18 dry cleans.

Dry Cleaning

Kilts are all wool and so CAN NOT be washed. Teflon coating protects your kilt making it stain proof. However; if your kilt is not Teflon coated you need to take special care when attempting to remove a stain. If you are attending an event and a drink is spilled on your kilt you are best to splash water on the stain immediately. Kilts CAN NOT be submerged in water but an affected area of around one or two square inches may be treated. Later when cleaning the affected area you should use warm water and a mild soap and gently rub the stain, but we cannot stress enough this should be used only on the small affected area you SHOULD NOT attempt to clean the whole kilt using this method. Attempting to clean the kilt in this fashion could shrink the waistband and ruin your garment. If you have a separate swatch or cutting of your tartan we strongly recommend that you stain it in the same way your kilt was stained to use it for experiment before cleaning your kilt. For example, if your kilt was stained with red wine you should pour some red wine on the separate cutting or swatch of tartan and treat it with warm water and mild soap as advised.

If the stain does not lift we would then suggest that you send your kilt to a reputable dry cleaner to have the stain removed. In the UK dry cleaners will be more experienced in cleaning kilts however; overseas your dry cleaner may not be familiar with the garment and so if you are having your kilt professionally cleaned we still recommended to give your cleaner a small sample of tartan to practise first. This will rule out any potential damage, as cleaners worldwide might not have cleaned a kilt at all before. As a made to measure garment you want to eliminate any risk of damage.

Content of Kilt

Kilts are 100% all wool with cotton canvas and lining.
They have leather belt straps with metal buckles.
DRY CLEAN ONLY
DO NOT TUMBLE DRY

Transporting

Kilt Carrier
Kilt Wardobe

There are various ways to store and transport your kilt and highland wear. Our deluxe carry carries your kilt, jacket and all accessories and is available in Grey or Navy. The deluxe carry has a kilt tube which your kilt can be rolled up and stored in. The deluxe carry includes a large zip cover which we refer to as the wardrobe this will be used to store your jacket. The large zip bag also has pockets to hold your shoes, shirt, sgian dubh, sporran and other accessories.

Wood Clamp Hanger

We also stock wooden clamp kilt hangers, which are great for hanging your kilt.

Kilt Carrier

If your kilt becomes creased in storage you can lightly steam it. When storing your kilt in the wardrobe you should make sure that it is contained in a protective cover with moth balls so there is no risk of damage or wear.

FURTHER HELP AND INFO

Ken and Ewan MacDonald

Owner of Houston’s Ken MacDonald has had his own kilt for over 30 years and it is well maintained due proper care and storage. For further information on kilt storage and maintenance and to see Ken and his 30 year old kilt please view our helpful video clips at www.kiltmakers.com/tv/

We appreciate all feedback please comment and let us know if you have any questions!

© Houston Traditional Kiltmakers 2013

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Highlandwear Kilt Kilt Hire Kilts Kilts for Sale Scotland Scottish Clans Scottish History tartan traditions traditions

Tartan… The Celebrities Favourite!

Houston Kiltmaker’s is the only shop where you can physically see every tartan available. You might not be too impressed by that but; what if we told you there are around 14,000 tartans? Ahhh… now we have your attention! What can we say we love tartan, of course we are biased being a traditional Scottish Highland outfitter! However; it seems we aren’t the only ones who love tartan.

Tartan is an ongoing celebrity trend and it’s not just men rocking kilts, ladies have also bought into the tartan trend. Although kilts and tartan are a traditional form of dress adaptations of these such as tartan shirts, skirts and dresses can be found in high street fashion stores. Modern fashion designers such as Alexander McQueen and Vivienne Westwood have introduced tartan to the catwalks of the most high profile fashion shows giving highland wear a modern edge. Moschino is one of the latest high profile designers to introduce tartan to their line. Tartan has become a noticeable celebrity trend with various styles been worn by stars such as Kiefer Sutherland, Chris Noth, Billy Connolly, Sean Connery, Rihanna, Katherine Jenkins, Taylor Swift, Victoria Beckham, Kylie Minogue and Emma Watson to name only a few. Furthermore, tartan has recently been worn by The Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton which has given the tartan trend a regal accreditation. As well as British royalty, Pop royalty have now bought into the tartan trend! Going all out, Jermaine Jackson recently donned a full highland outfit whilst he toured in Glasgow with his brothers Jackie, Tito and Marlon.

Image available: http://www.heraldscotland.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/400xY/2013/3/20385823.JPG

This celebrity trend has widened the tartan appeal around the globe to a much larger and more diverse audience. So much so that global star Susan Boyle has now decided to create her own tartan! The first person to wear the tartan is none other than SuBo’s childhood heartthrob Donny Osmond! Susan performed with Donny and sister Marie at their concert in Glasgow’s SECC. She asked Donny to come on stage and presented him with a range of Scottish gifts including a tie woven in her own Boyle tartan.

image available: http://img.thesun.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01672/SNA1327TAR_1672268a.jpg

We reckon Susan’s tartan will be a massive seller worldwide and will be a must have item for her millions of followers.

So will you be after a SuBo tartan scarf? Are you a fan of the tartan trend?

Let us know, comment below!

(Information gathered from the Scottish Tartans Authority, Tartan Herald)

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Easy Kilt Alterations Guide

Houston Kiltmakers Easy Kilt Alterations Guide

Clothes are symbolic. There are symbolic of era, culture and individual character. Let’s face it we all do it. We look through old photos and shake our heads at the many years of fashion faux pas. We look at the garments that we once thought were fashionable and wonder how some fashions have resurfaced in later years. There is a well known saying in the fashion and retail industry that fashion always repeats itself. However there is one garment that never seems to go out of fashion; the kilt!

Tartan kilts have been worn for centuries and are one of the few traditional garments that are still making an appearance on catwalks today. A kilt is a garment that will last you a lifetime so it is very important that you buy a heavy weight cloth and have it made by a reputable kiltmaker. If you have your kilt cut for growth it can be easily taken in or let it over the years should you lose or gain weight. This will also allow the kilt to be passed down as a family heirloom and easily adjusted for other family members. Adjusting you kilt buckles will easily tighten or loosen you kilt to ensure a perfect fit. Read the instructions below for some very easy fine tuning advice.

TAKING IN YOU KILT

See photo A

Photo A shows the outside of the front apron of your kilt. This is the buckle that must be moved to make your adjustments. So un-pick the stitching around the buckle attached to kilt and move in towards the belt loop. You can resize to meet whatever needs however; we suggest you try 1 inch, to start with then pin on. Follow the same instructions on the bottom hip strap on the outside of your apron; this may need a bit less positioning.

Then see photo B

Find the strap inside or under the back apron of your kilt. Un-pick some stitching around the leather strap and move in towards the middle of your apron, this will tighten up. Adjust to whatever measurement you need. We suggest you try about 1 inch first and tack in place

After making these adjustments try on your kilt. Make sure you are happy with the size and fit. If you are happy with the size, re stitch the outside buckles, onto your kilt.
Then stitch the inside leather strap back onto your kilt.
There you have it, job done!
If you have any trouble with this a good seamstress should be able to carry out this process with minimal effort.

LETTING YOUR KILT OUT

See photo C

Photo C shows the inside of the front apron of your kilt. This is the buckle that must be moved to make your adjustments. So un-pick the stitching around the buckle attached to kilt and move out towards the belt loop. You can resize to meet whatever needs however; we suggest you try 1 inch, to start with then pin on. Follow the same instructions on the bottom hip strap on the inside of your apron; this may need a bit less positioning.

Then see Photo D

Find the strap on the inside apron of your kilt. Un-pick some stitching around the leather strap and move out towards the edge of your apron. Adjust to whatever measurement you need. We suggest you try about 1 inch first and tack in place

After making these adjustments try on your kilt. Make sure you are happy with the size and fit. If you are happy with the size, re stitch the outside buckles, onto your kilt.
Then stitch the inside leather strap back onto your kilt.
There you have it, job done!
If you have any trouble with this a good seamstress should be able to carry out this process with minimal effort.

FURTHER HELP AND INFO

Owner of Houston’s Ken MacDonald has had his own kilt for over 30 years and has his kilt adjusted regularly to ensure the perfect fit.
For further information on kilt adjustments and to see Ken and his 30 year old kilt please view our helpful video clips at www.kiltmakers.com/tv/

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Gifts Highlandwear Kilt Kilt Hire Kilts Kilts for Sale Scotland Scottish History tartan traditions traditions Valentine's Day Wedding Proposal

Valentine’s Day… Love in the Digital Era

It’s that time of year again, love is in the air and every shop window is full of hearts and flowers. You guessed it; VALENTINE’S DAY! There are of course mixed opinions on this particular holiday. Many believe it to be the most romantic day of the year, others think it’s just another money making scandal!

It is true that Valentine’s Day has become something of a spectacle with flower shops charging more for red roses on Valentine’s Day than for any other day throughout the year. For many people it becomes a competition; how many gifts you give or indeed receive is somehow symbolic of how much you love or are loved.

It seems that the majority of us do not send cards any more and instead send on a Happy Valentine’s Day text message to our sweethearts instead! The Huffington Post reported that in Britain sales of Valentine’s Gifts dropped between 2011 and 2012. They also disclosed a report from O2 which stated that 11 million more text messages were on last Valentine’s Day last year, which was substantially higher than the number of text messages sent any other day in the month of February.

So what do you think? Are you an old romantic at heart? Do you expect card’s, flowers, and a big fuss? Or do you think Valentine’s Day is a load of nonsense? Well in Scotland it seems we are quite the charmers as reports show Glasgow to be the most romantic city! On the 13th February 2012 with the percent of postage sent in Scotland went up significantly!

Houston’s are a traditional company and so we understand how important it is to move with the times. We have our website www.kiltmakers.com, an app which allows you to design your own tartan and receive emails, calls and texts everyday regarding orders and general enquiries. At Houston’s our highlandwear and values are traditional but of course our ways of communicating with customers are not!

So is this now the new norm? Would you be happy to receive a text from your Valentine instead of a card?

Comment below and let us know!

Let us just take a moment to wish all you old romantics proposing on Valentine’s Day 2013 all the luck in the world! We hope the answer is YES!

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Highlandwear Kilt Kilt Hire Kilts Kilts for Sale Scotland Scottish Clans Scottish History tartan traditions traditions Wedding Kilts

Scottish Wedding Traditions

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner! The shops are full of cards, hearts and chocolates and love is in the air! With many romantic Scots planning a Valentine’s Day Proposal or indeed a Valentine’s Day Wedding; here at Houston’s HQ we thought we’d fill you in on some age old traditions for your traditional Scottish wedding!

Firstly, it is customary for the gentleman to ask his girlfriends Father for her hand in marriage. Although this tradition has become less popular of late it is still practised. Many couples will have an engagement party to celebrate the union, you know us Scots; any excuse for a party! The party will of course be filled with family, friends, loved ones, dancing and of course celebratory drinks to toast the happy couple.

At the wedding ceremony there are many traditions which are carried out at almost every wedding. One of the most important is music . Bagpipes are of course symbolic of traditional Scottish music but there are often other instruments involved such as the harp. This may be involved in the wedding ceremony and then carry on afterwards at the reception.

Dress code is of course a very important factor in any wedding. However in Scotland it is suggested that the couple state the dress code on their wedding invitation. Dress code is often dependant on the venue and time of day. For ladies the dress code would imply whether or not they should wear a hat. However; more importantly for the men it would be outlined if they should wear Highlandwear, morning wear, lounge suits, black tie or smart casual.

If the groom wears a kilt it is suggested all his grooms men wear matching attire. Tartan for the kilt is a personal choice. Some men choose their family or clan tartan but others will choose a colour which coordinates with the bridesmaids dresses. Organising kilt hire is one of the Best Man’s duties. Best man duties include looking after the groom before, during and after the wedding. Duties also include organising the hires of outfits for the groomsmen. This includes fittings, collection and return of hires, etc.

One of the most important (and for the men nerve racking) traditions is the toasts. Tradition dictates that the father of the bride prepares a speech and at the end offers the first toast to the bride and groom. This speech usually offers advice and well wishes for the future and is often filled with funny anecdotes from the brides childhood or personal stories about hid daughter and new son in law. The groom will then give his wedding toast, which generally includes special thanks his parents, the bridal party, and to all those involved in organising the big day. The best man is the last to toast. This toast is normally the most dreaded by the groom as tradition states that it be filled with funny or even embarrassing stories about the groom!

Thereafter tradition states that everyone attending must join the bride in groom in making their special day the best day of their lives!

On that note Houston’s would like to wish all those proposing ad getting married this year all the luck in the world! If you have any further questions regarding this blog please don’t hesitate to comment below. Or if you wish to hire or buy highland wear for a wedding visit our website www.kiltmakers.com

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Tips on Wearing a Kilt!

Highland wear can be a tricky business! Especially for men wearing a kilt for the first time. It’s a whole new experience and we want to make sure you get everything just right so your outfit looks perfect! Houston Kiltmakers want to assist you any way we can so have a look below at our useful hints and tips on highland wear!

1. Put your socks on first; make sure ribs on socks are running vertical and not twisted. Top of socks should be parallel and same length. Put the garter flashes on socks to the outside of your leg, making sure there is a three to four inch gap between the top of the socks and bottom of the kilt. About one inch below the knee is an ideal resting point for your socks.

2. Put your sgian dubh down the right leg of your sock. If you are left handed it can be worn down your left leg.

3. Put your ghillie brogue shoes on, twist the laces three to four times and take round back of the calf. Return them to the front of your shin about 2/3 of the way up and tie in a normal bow quite firmly and show to the front or side as preferred. If you find the laces are constantly slipping down and becoming loose then wrap them lower down your leg or round your ankle a couple of times.

4. Put on your shirt making sure any creases are ironed out, and put your cufflinks on.

5. Make sure the kilt pin is on the front apron only, on the fringed side of your kilt about two inches from the bottom and side of the fringe.

6. Put your kilt on making sure it is a good fit and it sits well up (about one and a half inches above the hip bone). Then look at the front apron and make sure the centre line is down the middle of the kilt so it is well balanced with pleats to the back. When looking in the mirror the kilt should be in an A shape with the sides well balanced.

7. Clip the chain strap onto the sporran, then put the chain strap through the kilt belt loops and fasten your sporran at the back of the kilt. Make sure the sporran is centred to front apron, positioned about four to five inches below the top of the kilt. You can rest the chain strap on top of the kilt buckles if you wish. This will secure the sporran a bit better.

8. Then put the belt and buckle on covering the chain strap. We recommend jacket wearing a belt as if you remove your jacket and waistcoat during an event the outfit will look bare, so we include a belt with all our hires. Check that the belt buckle is about one to two inches above the sporran.

9. If you are wearing a shoulder plaid, fasten under your left hand jacket lapel and fasten with plaid brooch onto jacket only.

10. Put on your waistcoat, then jacket. Make sure the jacket is fitting square on, with the waistcoat buttons, tie, sporran, buckle and kilt centre line all straight up and down. If driving to a venue, we advise that you hang the jacket up in the back and put it on when you get out the car. Try not to drive with your jacket on as it may crease.

11. Finally put on your tie, bow, ruche or standard tie.

12. Make sure you have a dram in your sporran flask and have an optional sprig of heather for your button hole.

We hope this information helps! Please comment below with any questions!

Houston Traditional Kiltmakers Est. 1909

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Hiring vs Buying… Making an informed decision!

Bute Heather Tartan Kilt Collection
Bute Heather Tartan Kilts

There’s always an occasion to wear a kilt to. We have Burn’s Supper in January and then for the old romantics maybe a Valentine’s Day Wedding in February. Christenings, funerals, parties, through to May when Communion ceremonies start and then wedding season begins! Whether it’s your own event or that of friends or family there are sure to be many events to keep your social calender full at the weekends right through to the festive period and Hogmanay, then your back to January getting your kilt ready for Burn’s Supper again!

A kilt is a garment that last a lifetime and one that will never go out of fashion. However; with so many choices of tartan the fashion concious customers may opt to hire for each individual event and try a new tartan every time! Other may choose to buy their family tartan or a couple may decide to merge their clan tartans to create a new family tartan and have it specially woven for their wedding. It can be hard to decide whether to hire or buy but here is a quick breakdown to help you make an informed decision.

Hiring

As previously mentioned hiring may be ideal for the fashion concious kilt wearer. You can pick a different tartan each time you hire. This can often be a good option if you are one of the grooms men and need your kilt to coordinate with the bridesmaids dresses. If the grooms men plan to hire for a wedding always remember to ask your kilt maker if they provide a group hire option as this can be very cost effective! Houston’s offer a group hire option where if 5 men hire kilt outfits the groom will get his for free!

With a choice of 130 tartans Houston’s is the place to go as most hire shops have a choice of between 6 an 16.

Always ask how much you need to pay and whether or not it is refundable due to cancellation, you never know what might happen and you don’t want it to cost you!

Make sure your hire outfit includes everything you will need, you don’t want to discover on your wedding day that you are minus one shirt!

Buying

Often men will hire as buying a full kilt pack can be very costly. However; Houston’s are one of the few who provide a hire and buy option where if you buy your kilt we will provide the rest of the outfit for hire free of charge. We also have a kilt sale on and are offering 20% off made to measure kilts until the 28th February 2013 so there is no better time to buy! Using this option you can build up your kilt pack over time.

If you choose to buy a kilt it truly is a garment that will last a lifetime. So, many will choose their family tartan for its sentimental value. This made to measure garment can be cut for growth so it can be let out if you lose weight or alternatively it can be let out if you gain. That way the garment could also be passed on to the next generation of the family. Also if you buy your kilt for your wedding day, in the same way your wife keeps her dress you will have your kilt as a wonderful reminder of the best day of your life, difference being you can wear yours again!

If you are buying your kilt for a specific occasion make sure you allow 6 – 8 weeks for the production process.

Hiring is a great option for local customers as they can visit the shop easily however; for customers purchasing overseas buying is your only option unless you will be staying in Scotland for your event.

This is a short pro’s and con’s list to give you a better idea of what your options are. We hope this helps! Please feel free to ask us any questions we will try and help you in any way we can!

Don’y forget to find us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/HoustonKiltmakers1909
and Twitter: @Houstonkilts

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Burns Supper, Honouring Robert Burns

Bute Heather Tartan Kilt Collection
Bute Heather Tartan Kilts

A very poignant date in the Scottish calender is 25th January… Burn’s Night. Burn’s night is the birthday of arguably Scotland’s most famous poet and lyricist. On this night we celebrate the life and works of Robert Burn’s or as he is referred to locally in Scotland ‘Rabbie’. Known globally for the beautiful ‘auld lang syne’ Rabbie Burns is one of Scotland’s most credited individuals, so it is only fitting that we celebrate him with a night of poetry, dancing, dining and a few whiskeys!

Burn’s supper can consist of a family gathering or a formal organised event. For the big Burn’s events there are a range of traditions which must be included. At the start of the evening a piper will normally play as the guests arrive. After guests have arrived the host or organiser will welcome and introduce the guests and the evening’s entertainment.

Afterward a prayer known as The Selkirk Grace is read thanking God for the food we are about to receive.

Some hae meat and canna eat,
And some wad eat that want it,
But we hae meat and we can eat,
And sae the Lord be thankit.

This is then proceeded with Piping in the Haggis. Haggis is brought to the room, and at this stage guests would normally stand. Haggis is introduced to the room on a silver platter by the chef, the piper and the person who will address the Haggis. When the haggis is placed on the table the piper will stop and guests will once again be seated.

Then comes the important prospect of ‘Addressing the Haggis’. A tradition in which one individual will recite ‘To a Haggis’ and cut the haggis with a knife which is met by applause from the guests. The host will then raise a glass to toast the haggis and will prompt the audience to join in by raising a glass and shouting, ‘The haggis!’

Now for the best part the traditional Burn’s supper which often consists of cock a leekie soup as a starter and haggis neaps and tatties for the main course. Or for those out with Scotland this translates as haggis mashes potatoes and turnips. Sweets often include Clootie Dumpling or a Scottish sherry trifle and the meal is finished with tea coffee and cheese boards. All of which is of course n true Scottish style accompanied by lots of wine, beer and whisky!

It is now time for the first entertainer who often recites Burn’s poems or songs, most popularly Tam o’ Shanter,
Holy Willie’s Prayer, or My Luve is Like a Red Red Rose.

It is then time for the host of the evening to deliver a speech on the life of Robert Burns including his life and work to which the speaker concludes with a toast: To the Immortal Memory of Robert Burns! This is then proceeded with the second entertainment where more of Burn’s work will be performed.

Then for the next toast (anything to raise a glass in Scotland!) Now it’s time for a Toast to the Lassies or to those who aren’t familiar with our colloquial Scottish tongue a toast to the ladies. This toast praises the role of women in the world today and the toast is concluded by the performer raising his glass to the room and announcing To the Lassies!

A final performance of Burn’s work is given before the ladies have their chance to respond to the gentleman’s toast to the lassies. The toast to the lassies and the ladies response to this are amongst the most humorous events that take place in the night.

The host of the evening now addresses the room and thanks everyone for their contribution to the evening and closes the proceedings by inviting guests to cross arms, join hands, stand up and sing or (perhaps slur) the classic Auld Lang Syne. So there you have it, a traditional Burn’s Supper! If you get the chance to attend it is a fantastic night or alternatively why not consider hosting your own! If you decide to go all out don’t forget to call Houston’s and get your kilt to wear!

Let us know if this has been helpful, and let us know where you will be celebrating Burn’s night!

From all at Houston’s, enjoy the Haggis!

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Hogmanay… Scottish New Year

Well the turkey has been eaten, the presents opened and Santa has been and gone! Christmas is over and done with well, for another year at least! But the party’s not over just yet, in Scotland we’re just getting started!

In Scotland we are well known for throwing a good party and New Year or as it’s known locally Hogmanay is the biggest party of the year in Scotland! Glasgow and Edinburgh are now well known party locations where thousands gather outside and countdown to the New Year! Whilst in New York everyone watches the ball drop, Scotland holds a countdown to ‘the bells’ which ring out at midnight at Edinburgh castle and symbolise the New Year beginning.

There are various quintessentially Scottish traditions associated with Hogmanay, for example; after the bells ring everyone will shake hands and offer a kiss on the cheek to wish one another a Happy New . We then cross our arms joining hands with one another in a circle and sing Rober Burns classic Auld Lang Syne.

“Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot for auld lang syne
For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne,
We’ll take a cup o kindness yet, for auld lang syne.”

The term auld lang syne is representative of notions of nostalgia and and days gone buy, in particular; those fondly remembered. It is when we sing these words that we reflect and raise a glass to the year past and the new one beginning.

Another popular tradition in Scotland is “First footing” this is the first foot in the house in the New Year. It was believed many years ago that it was good luck if the first footer were male, with dark hair and brought a gift such as coal, shortbread, salt, or whisky. It is still customary to give a gift when first footing, however; nowadays the gift is more commonly alcohol, shortbread, biscuits or sometimes even tea bags.

It is of course essential that you dress to impress to bring in the bells. The ladies will wear nice dresses and the gents wear suits and often kilts, trews and highland wear (enter Houston’s!).

These are some of our New Year’s traditions let us know yours!

Wherever you celebrate, and whatever you are doing Houston’s hope you are surrounded by loved ones and wish you all luck, love and good health in 2013!

For Auld Lang Syne!

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Christmas Scotland traditions traditions

Scottish Christmas

It’s that time of year again! In less than a week Santa will have visited all the good little boys and girls, the presents will have been opened, the dinner cooking away, the Christmas music blasting from every home, and family fun and festivities will be in full swing!
Many standard traditions will be fulfilled such as your grandparents or parents giving their annual ‘you don’t know how lucky you are…all I got in my day speech’. My Gran claims she got an apple and orange for Christmas. It would explain why she’s still going strong at 90 years old, you know what they say; an apple a day…
However, it seems that the concept of a traditional Christmas is a very distant memory. There are more homes with central heating than fires and kiddies receiving technological gifts from Santa such as mobile phones and iPods instead of bears and dolls but some things never change. In Scotland, even in changing times we like so many others will surround ourselves with family and the ones we love. We swap gifts, enjoy drinks and get all dressed up (even if we are just going to a family members house). Many will decide to stay in their pyjamas all day as Christmas is their first day to relax after the crazy working period leading to the 25th but most will stay in their pyjamas instead of venturing outside into the often adverse weather conditions!
Then, the food! Maybe its purpose is to heat everyone up but soup tends to be a popular starter! Scotland’s traditional Christmas dinner like many other countries is turkey with all the trimmings. Other dishes include steak pie or beef. The table is always set with crackers in place, the crackers will be pulled, the terrible joke told and then your lovely outfit will be accompanied by a silly paper crown. One family member will of course decide this is the time to take a photograph, thanks for that!
As the day draws in and things calm down, the family will often collect in one room and listen to music or watch the Queen’s speech, or Christmas movies. You quickly realise the meaning of Christmas when you realise how much you have laughed and enjoyed the day and look around at the people who made that possible.
On that note we would like to wish a very Merry Christmas to you and yours from Houston Kiltmakers in Paisley. We hope you have a fantastic day!