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  • admin 3:51 pm on January 27, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Heritage, information, , , , , , , Scottish heritage, , ,   

    The Scottish Kilt 

    Scottish  Kilt


    The Scottish Kilt is traditionally 8 yards ( 7.4 metres ) of pure new wool.

    Always made in Scotland.
    There are literally thousands of tartans to choose from. We will go into tartan in another post
    The weight of cloth is important to think about.
    16/17oz cloth ( Heavy weight ) is the best weight of authentic Scottish Kilt cloth as it sits and hangs and gives the best swing to the pleats. It is not any warmer than a 13oz kilt.
    For Larger guys heavy weight is by far the best cloth to use as it hangs much better over the belly and holds shape and looks a million dollars!
    13oz Medium weight is acceptable if you are under a 44/46″ waist
    19oz to 21oz is regimental weight cloth – only 6 tartans are woven in this weight now
    Traditionally the Scottish kilt is 100% hand made.
    The kiltmaker will take half a day to check the cloth, check sizes and prepare the tartan.
    The kiltmaker will then take around two days to make each kilt, there are around 6000 to 7500 stitches
    22 to 28 deep knife pleats ( Note kilts can be box pleated if you wish )
    All reinforced double stitched round the key areas where you get the most wear and tear.
    Houston’s make kilts with 3 buckles and straps so the customer has 1.5″ of adjustment either way
    All kilts are cut for growth so that they can be adjusted a few inches in years to come.
    Kilts can be made to normal sett where the pleats at the back are folded to repeat the tartan exactly ( so front and back of kilt looks exactly the same) or they can be regimental sett also called sett to the line where the kiltmaker will take one of the symmetrical predominant pivot lines and sett each pleat to that line so you just see lines down the back of the kilt and the front and back of the kilt looks totally different.. Note 90% of customers go with a normal sett kilt.
    Kilts normally take 6 to 8 weeks to make as long as the cloth is in stock. Kilts can be expressed quickly in a few weeks or a few days if required at a little extra
    If cloth has to be woven then kilts can take up to five or 6 months to make. That is why we always recommend booking at least six months before your function date if you can.
    Houston Kiltmakers is  a 4th generation family business based in Paisley established in 1909 by William.M Houston. Mr Houston’s Great grandson Ewan William MacDonald is now running the business and is passionate about .   At Houstons we have kiltmakers with decades of experience.
    If you are interested in getting a bespoke Authentic Scottish kilt you can come into the shop any time we are open

    or email shop@kiltmakers.com or if you are wanting to talk to one of the best then email

     
  • admin 12:22 pm on January 9, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 25th January, bagpipes, Burn's Night, Burn's Supper, cock a leekie soup, Haggis, , , neaps, pipers, , , Scottish heritage, , soup, tatties,   

    Burns Supper, Honouring Robert Burns 

    Bute Heather Tartan Kilt Collection

    Bute Heather Tartan Kilts

    A very poignant date in the Scottish calender is 25th January… Burn’s Night. Burn’s night is the birthday of arguably Scotland’s most famous poet and lyricist. On this night we celebrate the life and works of Robert Burn’s or as he is referred to locally in Scotland ‘Rabbie’. Known globally for the beautiful ‘auld lang syne’ Rabbie Burns is one of Scotland’s most credited individuals, so it is only fitting that we celebrate him with a night of poetry, dancing, dining and a few whiskeys!

    Burn’s supper can consist of a family gathering or a formal organised event. For the big Burn’s events there are a range of traditions which must be included. At the start of the evening a piper will normally play as the guests arrive. After guests have arrived the host or organiser will welcome and introduce the guests and the evening’s entertainment.

    Afterward a prayer known as The Selkirk Grace is read thanking God for the food we are about to receive.

    Some hae meat and canna eat,
    And some wad eat that want it,
    But we hae meat and we can eat,
    And sae the Lord be thankit.

    This is then proceeded with Piping in the Haggis. Haggis is brought to the room, and at this stage guests would normally stand. Haggis is introduced to the room on a silver platter by the chef, the piper and the person who will address the Haggis. When the haggis is placed on the table the piper will stop and guests will once again be seated.

    Then comes the important prospect of ‘Addressing the Haggis’. A tradition in which one individual will recite ‘To a Haggis’ and cut the haggis with a knife which is met by applause from the guests. The host will then raise a glass to toast the haggis and will prompt the audience to join in by raising a glass and shouting, ‘The haggis!’

    Now for the best part the traditional Burn’s supper which often consists of cock a leekie soup as a starter and haggis neaps and tatties for the main course. Or for those out with Scotland this translates as haggis mashes potatoes and turnips. Sweets often include Clootie Dumpling or a Scottish sherry trifle and the meal is finished with tea coffee and cheese boards. All of which is of course n true Scottish style accompanied by lots of wine, beer and whisky!

    It is now time for the first entertainer who often recites Burn’s poems or songs, most popularly Tam o’ Shanter,
    Holy Willie’s Prayer, or My Luve is Like a Red Red Rose.

    It is then time for the host of the evening to deliver a speech on the life of Robert Burns including his life and work to which the speaker concludes with a toast: To the Immortal Memory of Robert Burns! This is then proceeded with the second entertainment where more of Burn’s work will be performed.

    Then for the next toast (anything to raise a glass in Scotland!) Now it’s time for a Toast to the Lassies or to those who aren’t familiar with our colloquial Scottish tongue a toast to the ladies. This toast praises the role of women in the world today and the toast is concluded by the performer raising his glass to the room and announcing To the Lassies!

    A final performance of Burn’s work is given before the ladies have their chance to respond to the gentleman’s toast to the lassies. The toast to the lassies and the ladies response to this are amongst the most humorous events that take place in the night.

    The host of the evening now addresses the room and thanks everyone for their contribution to the evening and closes the proceedings by inviting guests to cross arms, join hands, stand up and sing or (perhaps slur) the classic Auld Lang Syne. So there you have it, a traditional Burn’s Supper! If you get the chance to attend it is a fantastic night or alternatively why not consider hosting your own! If you decide to go all out don’t forget to call Houston’s and get your kilt to wear!

    Let us know if this has been helpful, and let us know where you will be celebrating Burn’s night!

    From all at Houston’s, enjoy the Haggis!

     
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